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Lovely little find - ten points if you can tell me what it is and what period it is?!

Lovely little find - ten points if you can tell me what it is and what period it is?!

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xmorbidcuriosityx:


Mystery of Britain’s ‘Franken-mummies’
Two 3,000-year-old human skeletons dug up in the Outer Hebrides have been found to be a jigsaw of at least six different people who died hundreds of years apart.

It is one of Britain’s most intriguing archeological mysteries.


When two almost perfectly preserved 3,000-year-old human skeletons were dug up on a remote Scottish island, they were the first evidence that ancient Britons preserved their dead using mummification.


The scientists who uncovered the bodies also found clues that one of them – a man buried in a crouching position – was not a single individual, but had in fact been assembled from the body parts of several different people.


The discovery began a 10-year investigation into what had led the bronze-age islanders to this strange fate.




Now, a new study using the latest in DNA technology has found that the two skeletons together comprise the remains of at least six different individuals, who died several hundred years apart.

Now *this* is fascinating! Click here for the full story.

xmorbidcuriosityx:

Mystery of Britain’s ‘Franken-mummies’

Two 3,000-year-old human skeletons dug up in the Outer Hebrides have been found to be a jigsaw of at least six different people who died hundreds of years apart.

It is one of Britain’s most intriguing archeological mysteries.

When two almost perfectly preserved 3,000-year-old human skeletons were dug up on a remote Scottish island, they were the first evidence that ancient Britons preserved their dead using mummification.

The scientists who uncovered the bodies also found clues that one of them – a man buried in a crouching position – was not a single individual, but had in fact been assembled from the body parts of several different people.

The discovery began a 10-year investigation into what had led the bronze-age islanders to this strange fate.

Now, a new study using the latest in DNA technology has found that the two skeletons together comprise the remains of at least six different individuals, who died several hundred years apart.

Now *this* is fascinating! Click here for the full story.

(via arianaderalte)

Link

archaeologicalnews:

It looks like the rib cage of a large marine mammal, whose bones turned black as it was fossilised. The wreck was discovered in May during a dig in Antibes, on the French Riviera, prior to construction of a car park on the site of the Roman port of Antipolis.

Archaeologists have gradually…

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Stone Axe found at Brodsworth as promised. Gorgeous.

Stone Axe found at Brodsworth as promised. Gorgeous.

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madnikkopen:

Ivane Valley, Papua New Guinea.  Ancient artefacts unearthed in the highlands of Papua New Guinea provide some of the earliest evidence of human settlement of Sahul, the primordial landmass that once joined Papua New Guinea with Australia.
Charred nut shells from pandanus trees, fragments of animal bone and the remains of stone axes were found in the remote Ivane Valley of south-eastern Papua New Guinea - near the famous Kokoda Track - by a team led by archaeology Professor Glenn Summerhayes from the University of Otago, New Zealand. These artefacts, which have been dated to between 49,000 and 44,000 years old, may prompt a rethink of the traditional view that the prehistoric migration of people throughout the world took place along the coasts.

madnikkopen:

Ivane Valley, Papua New Guinea.  Ancient artefacts unearthed in the highlands of Papua New Guinea provide some of the earliest evidence of human settlement of Sahul, the primordial landmass that once joined Papua New Guinea with Australia.


Charred nut shells from pandanus trees, fragments of animal bone and the remains of stone axes were found in the remote Ivane Valley of south-eastern Papua New Guinea - near the famous Kokoda Track - by a team led by archaeology Professor Glenn Summerhayes from the University of Otago, New Zealand. 

These artefacts, which have been dated to between 49,000 and 44,000 years old, may prompt a rethink of the traditional view that the prehistoric migration of people throughout the world took place along the coasts.

Link

archaeologicalnews:

The search for the long-lost remains of King Richard III in Leicester, England, has turned up traces of what may be the church where the slain monarch was buried.

Leicester University archaeologists announced Friday that their excavations in a city council parking lot have turned up medieval window tracery, glazed floor tile fragments and medieval roof tile. The high-quality materials suggest that the team is indeed digging around the Greyfriars church, where Richard III is said to be buried.

“Today, what we are saying is that we have found the Greyfriars and have uncovered tantalizing clues as to the location of the church,” Richard Buckley, who co-directs the University of Leicester Archaeological Services, said in a statement. “It has gone about as well as we could hope for.” 

Read more.

(via gwebarchaeology)

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A Summer of Sausages, Sauerkraut and Mammendorf Cannibals! // Linden and Co.

One of my students :’) from Castleton has kindly written a contribution to the blog for their time spend abroad this summer in Mammendorf, Germany, its a damn interesting site so have a look

//

This summer I was lucky enough to take part in a Grampus Heritage European Archaeology Skills Exchange (EASE) placement. There were many to apply for throughout Europe but Germany was my first choice, and I think we were very lucky indeed! We arrived on Monday evening to Magdeburg south west of Berlin and were picked up and taken to work at 0700 Tuesday morning.

The site we were working at was a quarry about 20km away at a small village called Mammendorf, this area of Sachsen-Anahlt has huge amounts of archaeology and this site was no exception!

The archaeologist in charge Kerstin Kühne up until around 2 months prior was working on the site alone, until she asked for an assistant, Ingmar and a minidigger driver Jens, by the time we left 66,000sqm had been excavated!

The site and the area had been occupied since the Neolithic, and every metre of topsoil stripped back revealed more rubbish pits for us to excavate, this was what we did primarily for the 6 weeks, speed archaeology, we recorded each pit with the total station, cut a section with the mini-digger whilst checking the spoil, took photographs and filled in context sheets, and then took the remaining half out with the digger and again checking the spoil as we went along. It seemed horrifying, but with a three man team and only three months, there was no other way to get as much done as they could, and the 6 extra pairs of hands certainly increased the speed of operations.

Our training dig at Castleton was an introduction to working in the pouring rain and very few finds, well this turned out to be the opposite; 35 degrees C, desert like, and had more finds than you could shake a spade at.

The pits held much the same, broken Late bronze and early Iron age pottery, animal bones (Knochen) and the odd bit of human jaw bones! We designated these the Mammendorf Cannibals, although nothing of the sort, the theory is they are where Iron age pits have hit the earlier burials, and just chucked them back in with the waste. All of this in the first week, and for people so new to archaeology, it was quite a learning curve but amazing too!


The weather meant come the second week, we were ready to start on excavating the burials, we thought there were one or two, but it should have come as no surprise that by the time we left we were on 14 and counting, it was quite a privilege to be the first to see these bodies since they were buried some 3000 years ago, we had unearthed 3 different cultures whilst there, determined by the orientation of their burials, several of them contained cups near their heads. Sadly some were damaged by the “bagger” stripping back the topsoil for the quarry, and several of them were child burials. There was something very scary about excavating your first burial…I was terrified of breaking something, however we had an Anthropologist on the placement with us, who put our minds at ease when she said “don’t worry, they won’t break if they’re not already broken, get stuck in!”

Other winning finds were a flint arrowhead, flint knife and a Bronze Swan neck needle!

Of course it wasn’t all work, evenings and weekends some of us took full advantage of the price of beer and the chance to sit outdoors in Magdeburg and watch the world go by. Others (like me) made the most of the food…who doesn’t need wurst and cake the size of your head for a euro from every street corner?! I’d like one of each bitte!”

We also explored the local area, using the month tram ticket we were provided, went swimming and had to call the police as two of the group found a bit of more recent human skull on a sand spit in the lake! We also made the hour trip to the Halle state museum for prehistory. This houses the famous Nebra Sky Disc and we had an English speaking guide to take us around.

That said some of us spoke no German at all when we arrived, on leaving we could do useful things like order a large beer, ask for the same again, buy cake, name archaeological tools, swear proficiently and find our way around in German with only a few funny looks!

Sadly the time flew past far too quickly and our six weeks were up, we said sad farewells to the quarry workers, and particularly Kerstin, Ingmar and Jens who had really looked after us during our stay. The skills we’ve all gained, and the experience are worth so much, I’d highly recommend anyone apply for a place, it was very sad to leave, but excellent to get home to a house of my own. If anything a dusty sunburnt six weeks have made me more excited to start my second year of Uni…now where did I put my hat….


//

Thanks Linden, awesome dig by the sounds of it and thanks for the blog!

Keep and eye out for pictures of Stone Axes among other things. And of course… Keep diggin’!

AS

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Brodsworth? More like ‘LetsAccidentlyFindNeolithicAxeWorth’

As the title suggests this years Brodsworth Project was an excellent year! First of all, a massive thanks to all the students from Sheffield, Hull and Cardiff and local volunteers who came and worked with us! Not possible without y’all so cheers for all your work, hugely appreciated by all of the Project Managers and Supervisors. It was also a pleasure for me working with Elmet Archaeology for the first time - no doubt Ill see you all again in the future!

This year was primarily concerned with investigating a double ditched enclosure (pictured in the last post) which had some interesting and some less interesting finds. Various stages of occupation certainly made the feature difficult to deduce. Speaking primarily from the trench I was working on, the double ditched enclosure seemed a later stage than the adjoining  ditch, based on a few finds from the single adjoining ditch fill being later and the variety of fills in parts of the single ditch. The double ditch seems to have been filled naturally at a later period, but to say when would be a far stretch.

The most exciting find was most definitely a worked neolithic stone axe which was accidently found on part of the trackway around the edge of the field?!  Never the less, and interesting and intriguing find and opens up a whole new part of the pre-historic landscape to be investigated. (Ill get a photo posted at some point cos it is gorgeous)

As for the Project, its actually still on going for the rest of the week, just I am no longer working there! So this is a brief post for 3 weeks of project but as I was just one supervisor and was mainly concerned with one trench, that’s all I really have to say on it! Another great year, and I look forward to working there again next year.

Still waiting on the Italy post from JB but he’s a busy boy with his Masters and so on, so we’ll let him off… Also been told LW from Castleton is keen to write a piece on her time Germany so we’re a lucky bunch! As for me, I’m now working commercially so will be posting brief little updates on what I’m doing as and when I get the time.

Keep on Diggin’,

AS

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Life’s a ditch…

Life’s a ditch…

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All getting set up here at Brodsky, watch for more updates soon!

All getting set up here at Brodsky, watch for more updates soon!